Phrases

The Origin of a Phrase

The meaning of a phrase:

  • A Chip on your shoulder:
  •   Being very angry about situations that happened in the past.  Holding a grudge.
  • A Dime a Dozen:  
  •    Something that is very common and easy to acquire.
  •   A Fool and his Money are Soon Parted:    A person that is acting foolish with          money and possessions can lose their money due to carelessness or by being tricked.                                                  
  • A Piece of Cake:    A task that is easy to complete. Also similar to another phrase:  Easy As Pie.
  • An Arm and a Leg:   An idiom that means the price paid for something was extremely expensive.  Excessive.
  •   All Greek To Me:    When something doesn’t make any sense due to a complex nature.
  • Back to Square One:    To start over from the beginning.
  • Back to the Drawing Board:    To start over again on a design that previously failed.
  • Barking up the Wrong Tree:    To assume something that happened to another, and being wrong in doing so.
  • Beating A Dead Horse:    Bringing up old issues that once were resolved.
  • Beating Around the Bush:    Someone that avoids the issue or task.  Procrastination.
  • Between a Rock and a Hard Place:    When someone is given two difficult choices.
  • Birds of a Feather Flock Together:    People with similar interests gather together.
  • Break The Ice:   When a person is new to a group and gains social acceptance.
  • Burst Your Bubble:    To purposefully ruin another person’s celebration of happiness.